Acanthamoeba Keratitis

Image of a woman holding a tissue to her eye.

Acanthamoeba keratitis is a relatively rare type of eye infection, but it can become quite serious. If left untreated, Acanthamoeba eventually leads to vision loss, requiring a corneal transplant to restore sight. Understanding how to prevent this infection is key.

What Is Acanthamoeba Keratitis?

Acanthamoeba is a type of microscopic, single-celled organism known as an amoeba. Acanthamoeba live in all sorts of water sources. These parasites exist in tap water, natural bodies of water, wells, hot tubs, sewage, and can survive in the moisture in soil. When an Acanthamoeba infects the translucent, outer layer of the eye (the cornea), Acanthamoeba keratitis results.

Symptoms of Acanthamoeba Keratitis

The symptoms of Acanthamoeba keratitis include eye pain, redness, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, excessive tearing, and the sensation that something is stuck in one’s eye. These symptoms reflect those of more common eye infections like pink eye, and as a result the infection can be misdiagnosed.

If you experience any of these symptoms, it is important to see an eye care professional right away, as Acanthamoeba keratitis and other eye infections can lead to permanent loss of vision if not addressed immediately.

Who Is at Risk of Contracting Acanthamoeba Keratitis?

Individuals who wear contact lenses are substantially more likely to become infected with Acanthamoeba keratitis. Improperly cleaned and disinfected contact lenses, wearing contact lenses while swimming, bathing, showering, or hot tubbing also increase the risk.

Precautions against Acanthamoeba Keratitis

One can take several precautions against becoming infected with Acanthamoeba keratitis, such as always taking proper care of contact lenses, which includes cleaning and rubbing them after each use with a brand of contact solution recommended by an eye care professional. Disinfecting a contact lens case while not in use may also prevent infection. It is also recommended that contact wearers avoid wearing contact lenses while swimming, showering, or participating in any water-related activity. If a patient chooses to wear contact lenses in the water, airtight swimming goggles should be worn, and lenses should be removed for cleaning immediately after.

Diagnosis and Treatment

The Acanthamoeba keratitis infection is often mistaken for more common eye conditions, and usually not properly diagnosed until after the failed use of antibiotics. Once diagnosed, Acanthamoeba keratitis can be fairly difficult to cure, but is treated with topical anti-microbial agents. If symptoms persist, a corneal transplant might be necessary for the patient to achieve a full recovery.

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Testimonials

  • I have worn contact lenses for years but due to my strong near-sighted prescription with high astigmatism could get neither the comfort nor vision very good in standard gas permeable lenses or in soft lenses. I had reverted back to wearing glasses most of the time until Dr. Krywko recommended the SynergEyes lenses. They work great for me and I can finally wear contacts again! Thank you, Dr. Krywko!

    ...
    Show More - Anna Garity
  • Dr. Candria Kryko is a wonderful OD. I was seen by Dr. Kryko in Scottsdale recently for an eye exam/contact lens fitting. She is extremely pleasant, attentive, and she took her time to give me a thorough exam and answer all of my questions. Dr. Kryko gave me recommendations on contacts and eye drops, as well, she gave me tips on how I can save on some of my contact expenses. She was professional, attentive, took the time to explain what was needed, and was simply nice to be around. I recommend Dr. Kryko. 

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  • My entire family have been seeing Dr. Krywko for years. The professionalism, care and focus are over the top. I was told by an optician I would not be a likely candidate for contact lenses. However with Dr. Krywko's patience and wisdom she was able to fit me for contact lenses that work perfectly! I am thrilled..........Plus, I also have the most gorgeous frames (when I do not want to wear my contacts. ) I receive comments every time I wear them, " where did you get your glasses!" Dr. Kryko just received the newest styles......I'm in trouble..........

    ...
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